Provincial Domain Atlantikwall Raversyde

The Provincial Domain Atlantikwall Raversyde is a unique natural area located close to the sea. A diverse landscape invites visitors to a lovely walk. Raversijde is also a home to a rescue centre for birds and wild animals (VOC).

Go on a journey through time with the family, a fun treasure hunt through the history of the domain, or enjoy yourself on the playground or in the Testerep play forest, designed from recycled material.

You can let the dog run free on the dog meadow and enjoy the (free) photo exhibition set up in the entire park area.

In addition, in the provincial domain you will find four reconstructed fishermen’s houses of the medieval fishing village of Walraversijde.
ANNO 1465 will remain closed due to renovation works in 2024.

Leopold II purchased the area in 1902, and it became a Royal Domain. Among other things, a Norwegian chalet and stables were built. The park with its pond was laid out in 1906. The domain, which was part of the Royal Trust, was later systematically expanded by Albert I and Prince Karel. The Aachen Battery was built during the First World War and the Atlantic Wall was expanded during the Second World War, in the dune belt in both cases.

After the Second World War, Prince Karel took up residence in the domain and further expanded the park. In 1981 Prince Karel sold the domain to the Belgian state; it has been managed and further expanded by the Province of West Flanders since 1988. In the late 1990s, the southern part of the area was largely redesigned, with the extension of the archaeological site and the leisure park.

In 2014, the Province of West Flanders completely redesigned the area east of the Atlantikwall and ANNO 1465 as a scenic parc. The extensive grasslands were restored and more areas of vegetation, woodland and water bodies were introduced. Attractive walking and cycling paths were laid out, as well as a playground with play equipment and later also a dog-walking field. The old recreational zone and eastern car park disappeared. In late January and early February 2015, 20,000 new plants were planted, including 15,500 trees. These now have the space to grow.

  • Today we are closed.